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Issue 5 Science Shoutout

Highschooler’s Guide to the Ivy League

Getting into a good college doesn’t have to be a reward for extreme sacrifice; it can be, instead, a side effect of the much grander goal of building a meaningful and engaging life.

Cal Newport, How to be a High School Superstar

Think of a typical high school student who gets into a world-class college or university, like Cambridge, MIT, or one of the Ivy League universities. You might imagine someone with countless extracurricular activities, perfect grades, and loads of stress. What if there’s another way? What if, instead of sacrificing all your precious free time, you could get into a world-class college as a byproduct of leading an interesting life?

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Issue 5 Understanding Science

Undetectable: On LIGO and the importance of experiment

The principle of science, the definition, almost, is the following: the test of all knowledge is experiment. Experiment is the sole judge of scientific truth.

Richard Feynman, The Feynman Lectures on Physics
Credit: LIGO.
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Issue 5 News

Extending our portfolio

Believe it or not, we have been around for four months already, bringing you a variety of stories every Sunday. And although we have started out with certain topics and categories, our plan was never to stop there. In this News post, we bring you a look into our future prospects – new categories and new writers – by summarizing our past and current efforts.

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Academic Life BSc Issue 5 Presenting Alumni

Tamara Tica: “The Bumblekite scholarship is our way of giving back to the S3 community”

Hi Tamara, thank you for joining us for this interview! You are one of our alumni who chose to pursue a non-scientific career, yet your connections to people from S3 brought you back to collaborating with scientists. Before we delve deeper into the story of your bumpy academic ride, let’s get to know you a bit more. How would you introduce yourself?

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Issue 4 My Project

Modeling influence in online social networks

With this post, we are bringing you a new series of posts, where our long standing Alumni will be presenting their projects for you. In the first post of this kind, we are welcoming our ex-swapshop and project leader, as well as ex-organizer – Matija Piskorec. He did his PhD in Computer Science at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing at the University of Zagreb in combination with the Ruđer Bošković Institute.

Let’s welcome Matija and learn something about his project!

The Editorial Team
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DIY Science Issue 4

Simulating the bean machine

We’re doing this issue’s DIY Science a bit unconventionally: today, you’ll write your own program to simulate a bean machine, also known as the Galton board. What’s a bean machine, why is that interesting and how to write your first program – find out in today’s post.

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Academic Life Issue 4 MSc Presenting Alumni

Matea Balabanovska: “The S3 experience gave me the confidence to apply wherever I want”

Matea, thank you for finding the time to join us for this interview! You will be the first master’s student we will introduce in Presenting Alumni. Furthermore, you are one of our non-Croatian participants, coming from North Macedonia, but you’re doing your studies in the UK. And another interesting fact is that you do some part time research as well? Sounds totally cool!

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Issue 4 Understanding Science

Using our own body to fight cancer – the era of immunotherapy

Most of us probably know someone who’s suffered from cancer, is still suffering or, unfortunately, we have it ourselves. Media daily feed us information on this topic, covering a wide range of news on the newest cancer drugs, treatments or medical discoveries. And yet, you might wonder why, after years and years of research, we still haven’t successfully found a universal cure for cancer. The answer to this is more complex than it seems – so let’s take it step by step.

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Issue 3 Understanding Science

Program and Prejudice: On algorithmic bias

We rely on computers to make all sorts of decisions these days: computers can decide faster and better than humans, for the most part. Whether you swipe a card in a store, open up Netflix to take a look at its recommendations or search your computer for that one file you just can’t find, a computer takes a look at the data available, runs an algorithm and gives you a result. That data can be your account balance, past viewing activity or an index of your files, but it can be something much more important – and as we grow to trust computers to perform more and more tasks that humans have traditionally been doing, how can we make sure that they make the right decisions? And are they making good decisions right now? Or are they actually amplifying sexism and racism?

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Issue 3 Science Shoutout

Quantum

“Anyone who is not shocked by quantum theory has not understood it.”

Niels Bohr (and others, with variation)